EUC2?

By M. David Peterson
December 9, 2008

As per the recent announcement in the AWS:EC2 forums from Attila@AWS:

Dear AWS Developer,

We are excited to announce that we have extended Amazon EC2 to Europe. Developers and businesses can now run their Amazon EC2 instances in the EU to help achieve lower latency, operate closer to other resources like Amazon S3 in the EU, and meet EU data storage requirements when applicable. The new European Region for Amazon EC2 contains two Availability Zones enabling you to easily and cost effectively run fault-tolerant applications with the same scalability, reliability and cost efficiency achieved with Amazon EC2 in the U.S.

With today's launch, you can take advantage of the latest features of Amazon EC2 including multiple Availability Zones, Elastic IP addresses, and Amazon Elastic Block Store (Amazon EBS). In the near future, Amazon EC2 will also add support for Windows Server and SQL Server in the EU, which is a new feature that was recently introduced on Amazon EC2 in the US.

Please visit the following pages for more information:

Release Notes

Amazon EC2 Detail Page and Pricing

Feature Guide: Amazon EC2 Regions

Sincerely,

The Amazon EC2 Team

Very nice! Having been a part of the private beta cycle for the EC2:EU data center I have to admit that the Amazon Web Services team is getting /incredibly good/ at keeping a low profile during the development of new products, releasing them as production services to the world at mind numbing speeds. It wasn't long ago that a private beta cycle for an AWS-based service would last 6-9 months. Now?

Not very long. At all.

This is the thing that competitors such as Microsoft need to pay the most attention to:

Getting production services into the hands of paying customers as quickly as possible w/o attempting to boil the ocean. In other words, one web service at a time. One could easily have seen a process in which someone@AWS back in the 2005/6 time frame said: "To do this right, we need multiple data centers in multiple locations across the planet before we can launch. And what good is a storage service if we don't offer computing services and a queue service and a database service as well? We'll get laughed off the utility computing planet!" attempting to boil the utility computing ocean in one go. Given the leap frog lead AWS now has on everyone in the marketplace, that obviously would have been a big mistake.

Fortunately -- for both them and for us -- they were smart enough to realize winning customers one data center and one web service at a time was the way go.

Nice work, Amazon Web Services!


You might also be interested in:

News Topics

Recommended for You

Got a Question?